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Epsilon User's Manual and Reference
   Commands by Topic
      . . .
      Buffers and Files
         Buffers
         Files
         File Variables
         . . .
         Buffer List Editing
      Starting and Stopping Epsilon
         Session Files
            Locating The Session File
         File Associations
         Sending Files to a Prior Instance
         . . .
      Running Other Programs
         The Concurrent Process
         Compiling From Epsilon
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Starting and Stopping Epsilon  Commands by Topic   Locating The Session File


Epsilon User's Manual and Reference > Commands by Topic > Starting and Stopping Epsilon >

Session Files

When you start up Epsilon, it will try to restore the window and buffer configuration you had the last time you ran Epsilon. It will also restore items such as previous search strings, your positions within buffers, and the window configuration. The -p flag described in Epsilon Command Line or the preserve-session variable may be used to disable restoring sessions.

You can set the session-restore-max-files variable to limit the number of files Epsilon will reread, which is by default 25. The files are prioritized based on the time of their last viewing in Epsilon, so by default Epsilon restores the 15 files you've most recently edited. Also, Epsilon won't automatically restore any files bigger than the size in bytes specified by the session-restore-biggest-file variable. For files accessed via URLs, Epsilon uses the variable session-restore-biggest-remote-file instead.

By default, Epsilon records dired buffers (see Directory Editing) in its session file and recreates them the next time you start Epsilon, except for remote direds that use a URL. Set the variables session-restore-directory-buffers or session-restore-max-directories to customize this.

You can set the session-restore-directory variable to control whether Epsilon restores any current directory setting in the session file. Set it to 0 and Epsilon will never do this. Set it to 1 and Epsilon will always restore the current directory when it reads a session file. The default value 2 makes Epsilon restore the current directory setting only when the -w1 flag has been specified. (Under Windows, Epsilon's installer includes this flag when it makes Start Menu shortcuts.)

You can set the session-restore-files variable to control whether Epsilon restores files named in a session file, or just search strings, command history, and similar settings. If session-restore-files is 0, when Epsilon restores a session, it won't load any files named in the session, only things like previous search strings. If 1, the default, Epsilon will restore previous files as well as other settings. If 2, Epsilon will restore previous files only if there were no files specified on Epsilon's command line. The session-always-restore variable is more drastic, turning off session files entirely when there's a file specified on Epsilon's command line.

The write-session command writes a session file, detailing the files you're currently editing, the window configuration, default search strings, and so forth. By default, Epsilon writes a session file automatically whenever you exit, but you can use this command if you prefer to save and restore sessions manually.

The read-session command loads a session file, first asking if you want to save any unsaved files. Reading in a session file rereads any files mentioned in the session file, as well as replacing search strings, all bookmarks, and the window configuration. However, any files not mentioned in the session file will remain, as will keyboard macros, key bindings, and most variable settings. If you use either command and specify a different session file than the default, Epsilon will use the file name you provided when it automatically writes a session file as you exit.

Subtopics:

Locating The Session File



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