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Epsilon User's Manual and Reference
   Changes from Older Versions
      . . .
      EEL Programming Changes in Epsilon 11
         New EEL Primitives and Subroutines in Epsilon 11
         Changes to EEL Primitives and Subroutines in Epsilon 11
      New Features in Epsilon 10
         . . .
         More Use of Syntax Coloring in Epsilon 10
         Easier Commenting of Code in Epsilon 10
         Source Code Navigation in Epsilon 10
         File Handling in Epsilon 10
         Running Programs in Epsilon 10
         . . .
      Enhanced Features in Epsilon 10
         Dired Enhancements in Epsilon 10
         Searching & Navigation in Epsilon 10
         Grep and Multifile Searching in Epsilon 10
         . . .
         Other Changes in Epsilon 10
      . . .

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Epsilon User's Manual and Reference > Changes from Older Versions > New Features in Epsilon 10 >

Source Code Navigation in Epsilon 10

Epsilon provides several new commands that help you determine how the code you are editing relates to other code.

  • Epsilon displays in the window title or mode line the name of the thing you are editing. This might be the name of the current function or procedure in the C-like languages or Perl. Or for C++ Epsilon displays the name of the class or struct, if point is inside such a definition. Epsilon knows about class member functions, too.

    See the variable display-definition for details.

  • You can also have Epsilon list all of the definitions in the buffer by typing Alt-<Quote>, which runs list-definitions. This pops up a list of the functions, classes, and variables that appear in the buffer. For classes, the command lists both the class name and any members, appropriately indented so you can tell which belongs to which.

    You can select one of the definitions to go there, or dismiss the list with Ctrl-G. When the list comes up, the item selected is the definition corresponding to the current place in the buffer. So a quick way to go to the top of the current definition is to type Alt-<Quote> followed by <Enter>.

    The list-definitions command works in all modes that implement tagging.

  • The new Alt-I command displays the #if conditionals in effect for the current line in the buffer. By looking at the list you can tell which preprocessor items must be true and which must be false, in order for the current line to be included.

    This works in the C-like languages, and also when editing makefiles.

    See the list-preprocessor-conditionals command.

  • We made several improvements to the tagging facility. Tagging works better with C++ classes and preprocessor conditionals, and includes structure members.

    With a numeric argument, the tag-files command includes function and variable declarations, in addition to definitions. This is useful when you do not have source code to a library and want to treat a header file as the primary source for definitions.

    Epsilon now automatically retags the current file if it cannot find a tag.

    The new untag-files command lists all the files referenced by the current tags file, then lets you delete references to particular files.



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