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Epsilon User's Manual and Reference
   Commands by Topic
      . . .
      Fixing Mistakes
         Undoing
         Interrupting a Command
      The Screen
         Display Commands
         Horizontal Scrolling
         Windows
         . . .
      Buffers and Files
         Buffers
         Files
         File Variables
         . . .
         Buffer List Editing
      . . .

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Interrupting a Command  Commands by Topic   Horizontal Scrolling


Epsilon User's Manual and Reference > Commands by Topic > The Screen >

Display Commands

The Ctrl-L command causes Epsilon to center point in the window. If you give a numeric argument to Ctrl-L, Epsilon makes the current line appear on that line of the window. For instance, give a numeric argument of zero to make the current line appear on the topmost line of the window. (The line-to-top command is another way to do this.) If you give a numeric argument greater than the number of lines the window occupies, Epsilon will position the current line at the bottom of the window. (The line-to-bottom command is another way to do this.) When repeated, the Ctrl-L command also completely refreshes the screen. If some other program has written text on the screen, or something has happened to garble the screen, use this command to refresh it.

The Alt-<Comma> and Alt-<Period> commands move point to the first and last positions displayed on the window, respectively.

The Ctrl-Z and Alt-Z commands scroll the text in the window up or down, respectively, by one line. These scrolling commands will move point as necessary so that point remains visible in the window.

The Ctrl-V and Alt-V commands scroll the text of the window up or down, respectively, by several lines fewer than the size of the window. These commands move point to the center line of the window.

You can control the exact amount of overlap between the original window of text and the new window with the window-overlap variable. A positive value for this variable means to use that number of screen lines of overlap between one window of text and the next (or previous). A negative value for window-overlap represents a percentage of overlap, instead of the number of screen lines. For example, the default value for window-overlap of 2 means to use 2 lines of overlap. A value of -25 for window-overlap means to overlap by 25%.

You can change how Epsilon pages through a file by setting the variable paging-centers-window. Epsilon normally positions the cursor on the center line of the window as you move from page to page. Set this variable to zero if you want Epsilon to try to keep the cursor on the same screen line as it pages.

The goto-line command on Ctrl-X G prompts for a line number and then goes to the beginning of that line in the current buffer. If you prefix a numeric argument, Epsilon will use that as the line number. Use the format 10:20 to include a column specification; that one goes to line 10, column number 20. Or use a percent character to indicate a buffer percentage: 25% goes to a line 25% of the way through the buffer. Or use the format p123 to go to a particular buffer offset, counting by characters.

The Ctrl-X L command shows the number of lines in the buffer and the number of the line containing point. It also shows the number of bytes the file would occupy if written to disk. This can differ from the size of the buffer, because the latter counts each line separator as a single character. Such characters require two bytes when written to disk in the format used in Windows, DOS, and OS/2, however. See Line Translation for information on how Epsilon translates line separator characters. See the mode-format variable if you want to change how Epsilon displays the current line or column number in the mode line at all times, or draw-line-numbers if you want Epsilon to display each line's number in a column to its left.

The Ctrl-X = command displays in the echo area information pertaining to point. It shows the size of the buffer, the character position in the buffer corresponding to point, that character's column, and the value of that character in decimal, hex, and "normal" character representation, as well as the character's name for 16-bit Unicode characters.

The count-words command displays the number of words in the current buffer. Highlight a region first and it will count only words in the region. With a numeric argument, it prompts for a search pattern and then counts the number of instances of that pattern.

Standard bindings:

  Ctrl-L  center-window
 Ctrl-V, <PgDn>  next-page
 Alt-V, <PgUp>  previous-page
 Ctrl-Z  scroll-up
 Alt-Z  scroll-down
 <Home>, Alt-<Comma>  beginning-of-window
 <End>, Alt-<Period>  end-of-window
   line-to-top
   line-to-bottom
 Ctrl-X =  show-point
 Ctrl-X L  count-lines
 Ctrl-X G  goto-line
   count-words
 



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Interrupting a Command  Commands by Topic   Horizontal Scrolling


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