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Context:
Epsilon User's Manual and Reference
   . . .
   Commands by Topic
      Getting Help
      Moving Around
      Changing Text
      . . .
      Miscellaneous
   Command Reference
      . . .
      push
      query-replace
      quick-dired-command
      quoted-insert
      read-session
      . . .
   Variable Reference
      abort-file-io
      abort-file-matching
      abort-key
      . . .
      yank-rectangle-to-corner
   . . .

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query-replace  Command Reference   quoted-insert


Epsilon User's Manual and Reference > Command Reference >

quick-dired-command

Perform operations on the current file.  Alt-o

This command provides a convenient way to perform various operations on the file associated with the current buffer. It prompts for another key, with choices as listed below. Many of them are similar to the corresponding commands in a dired buffer.

D
deletes the file associated with the current buffer, after prompting for confirmation.

C
copies the file associated with the current buffer, prompting for a destination. If the buffer contains unsaved changes, they won't be in the copy; this command affects the file on disk only.

M
renames or moves the file associated with the current buffer, prompting for a destination. It doesn't change the file name associated with the current buffer, which will still refer to the original file.

<Period>
runs the dired command on the current file.

G
changes the current directory to the one containing the current file.

+
prompts for a subdirectory name, then creates a new subdirectory in the directory containing the current file.

!
prompts for a command line, then runs that command, appending the current file name to it. If the command line you type contains an *, Epsilon substitutes the current file name at that position instead of at the end. If the command line ends in a & character, Epsilon runs the program asynchronously; otherwise it waits for the program to finish.

V
runs the "viewer" for the current file; the program assigned to it according to Windows file associations. For executable files, it runs the program. For document files, it typically runs the Windows program assigned to that file extension. In Epsilon for Unix, it tries to display the file using the KDE, Gnome, or Mac OS X view setting for that type of file, by means of an epsilon-viewer script you can customize.

A
under Windows displays the file's current attributes (Hidden, System, Read-only and Archive) and lets you specify a new attribute list. Under Unix it runs the chmod command, passing it the mode specification you type, such as g+w to let group members write to the file.

T
displays the Windows property page for the file. (Epsilon for Windows only.)

F
opens the folder containing this file in Explorer. (Epsilon for Windows only.)

?
displays this list of subcommands.

More info:

Directory Editing



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query-replace  Command Reference   quoted-insert


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